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Topics: CSS
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Posted by Garren Harland on September 21, 2009, 2:09 pm.
Previously I have discussed how the horizontal scroll bars of a website can be prevented from appearing using CSS. However, the CSS property overflow can do even more. It can prevent scroll bars from appearing on your website entirely!
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Posted by Garren Harland on September 21, 2009, 1:31 pm.
Horizontal scroll bars are, when not required, one of the most annoying elements a web designer can bump into. And while usually they can be resolved with some careful HTML and CSS programming, sometimes they appear to be un-avoidable. Especially with layouts that require embedding pages via Frames.
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Posted by Garren Harland on September 5, 2009, 5:45 pm.
While most of us have gotten used to the idea of styling div and span tags, and to shape and mould them into something that fits our purpose, there are indeed quite a few other standard HTML tags out there that could bring a bit of spice and organisation into our code.
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Posted by Garren Harland on August 29, 2009, 1:50 pm.
There are two ways of defining the background color of a website's body, and other HTML elements. The first is the standard HTML method employed by most beginners. The second method is the more professional way of setting the background property in HTML, by using Cascading Style Sheets (CSS).
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Posted by Garren Harland on August 23, 2009, 7:56 pm.
Web-designers have for years been longing for a simple CSS command that can produce a rounded corner effect on various HTML elements. This is because although for years a work around has existed to produce this effect (using rounded corner pictures to fake the rounded corners), most of us long for a more code elegant solution.
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Posted by Garren Harland on August 23, 2009, 6:54 pm.
Thanks to CSS borders do not have to be plain things. Indeed, with the choice listed below there should be a border style suitable for ever occasion. Especially the three dimension borders are worth trying out.
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Posted by Garren Harland on August 22, 2009, 8:05 pm.
Here is a valuable trick for newbie web developers. On this page you will learn how to keep empty table rows, span and divs from collapsing on every browser.
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Posted by Garren Harland on August 18, 2009, 10:39 am.
If you are looking to style the links on your website with CSS congratulations! You are taking one big step towards producing professional web designs. With the help of CSS you will be able to provide your links not only with color and specified font styles, but most important of all with mouseover hover effects. One of the most important elements of a professional web design!
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Posted by Garren Harland on August 17, 2009, 1:03 pm.
This is one of those annoying HTML "bugs" that is easy to solve once you know how to go about it, but if you do not it can result in a frustrating search for solutions that can last for hours.
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Posted by Garren Harland on August 17, 2009, 12:27 pm.
An un-styled table is not the prettiest sight to be found on the world wide web. This is why proper styling via CSS is highly recommended. This tutorial will therefore cover how tables can be styled, through the prevision of background and border colors, along with styling the title row so that it is recognisable as such.
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Posted by Garren Harland on August 17, 2009, 11:13 am.
Previously I have discussed how various cursor styles can be accessed via CSS. This current tutorial will go one step further, and give an insight how the cursor property can be changed to another setting dynamically once the page has already been loaded.
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Posted by Garren Harland on August 17, 2009, 10:15 am.
For specific curser requirements CSS offers the property curser, which allows you to specify which type should appear when the mouse is hovered over an element. Here then is an introduction to the different types, including mouseover examples.
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Posted by Garren Harland on August 13, 2009, 18:50 pm.
Previously I have discussed how an image's opacity can be set via CSS. This feature can of course also be accessed via JavaScript in order to give your website a more interactive feeling!
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Posted by Garren Harland on August 13, 2009, 15:30 pm.
Most developers know that thanks to the CSS Opacity property HTML the background of HTML elements of div, span, or tables can be faded using CSS. The connection that some fail to make is that the same can be applied to images, and can potentially save a lot of time editing images in Photoshop. After all, changing a few lines of code is always quicker/easier than having to resave and upload a picture. It will also be more impressive to your boss and clients.
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Posted by Garren Harland on August 13, 2009, 14:55 pm.
Thanks to CSS Box like elements (div or span tags with borders) can float above one another to cause an overlapping effect. To produce this effect the following ingredients are necessary: at least two html elements, both with defined positions so that they overlap, and a so called z-index, which indicates which element is to appear above the other.
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Posted by Garren Harland on August 5, 2009, 5:10 pm.
The CSS float attribute can be used for far more than simply floating an image to the right or left of your content. When used properly you can even align 3 Divs next to each other, creating newspaper like columns.
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Posted by Garren Harland on July 23, 2009, 9:38 pm.
I decided to write a reference on the various list styles, and their availability on browsers such as Internet Explorer, Firefox and Opera. The revelation here is that out of the 10 styles listed below, only 5 worked on Internet Explorer (Version 8). Opera and Firefox were capable of interpreting all of them.
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Posted by Garren Harland on July 21, 2009, 9:13 pm.
Previously I have discussed how a span or div element's font family can be changed dynamically via the JavaScript function getElementByID(). Here then is a closer look at how to set font families correctly using CSS, followed by some comparative examples that you can look at on various browsers to test what fonts are supported by which browsers.
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Posted by Garren Harland on July 18, 2009, 8:46 pm.
I think the following code should be accompanied by a warning note. It would go along the lines of "Be aware, a very critical eye is needed to change scroll bars into something that resembles coolness, and does not end belonging on tacky-websites.com". The potential of someone actually using this code to actually improve the look of their website is in fact so small that Netscape has chosen not to interpret it.
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Posted by Garren Harland on July 18, 2009, 6:33 pm.
Aligning a div element at the center of a document can turn into a conscientious web designer's worst nightmare. The main reason for this headache of course being that different browsers react differently to the necessary CSS commands needed to accomplish this task.
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Posted by Garren Harland on July 11, 2009, 2:48 pm.
First of all, to change the height and width properties of a table or div element with getElementById() you will need to ensure that each of the HTML tags that you plan on becoming dynamic, have a unique ID attribute. The importance of this is highlighted in the example at the bottom of the page, where id1 is the defined ID for the example table, and id2 for the Div.
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Posted by Garren Harland on July 11, 2009, 1:08 pm.
Do you want to change font colors of div, span and table elements using JavaScript? Then here is the code that you have been looking for.
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Posted by Garren Harland on July 10, 2009, 4:35 pm.
One of the easiest ways to change a HTML element's background property is using JavaScript's getElementById() function. As previously discussed in other tutorials getElementById() accesses individual HTML tags by their defined ID tags, and through doing so allows various properties to be changed via JavaScript.
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Posted by Garren Harland on July 8, 2009, 8:01 pm.
I have previously discussed how to change the content of span or div tags by using getElementById and innerHTML. As you might be aware, getElementById() can do far more than just change content. Indeed it can access and manipulate a tag's style components. This tutorial will specifically focus on how you can manipulate borders by using JavaScript.
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Posted by Garren Harland on July 8, 2009, 6:41 pm.
Ever asked yourself why html elements have ID tags? You might be aware that they can be used to style an element with CSS, but using Classes makes far more sense most of the time. Especially since ID tags cannot be duplicated under any circumstances. But why not? Well, here is (at least one reason) why ID tags have to remain unique.
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Posted by Garren Harland on June 25, 2009, 2:27 pm.
If you are reading this I assume you have already familiarised yourself with HTML. You are probably at a stage where you want to take your designs to the next level, and learn some of the techniques that the professional webdesigners use. Learning how to utilize Cascading Style Sheets is a first step in the right direction.
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Posted by Garren Harland on June 23, 2009, 3:19 pm.
Want to add a background image to your HTML elements using CSS? Then you have come to the right place! Here is an example of CSS code that you can give to your html, body, div or table tags to provide them with a background image!
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